My new book, “Animated Life” is finally beginning to make its way through the distribution channels. If it's not in your local bookstore as yet just give it some time. Some have already ordered on Amazon.com and received their copies. Stranger still, I'm getting letters from Europe where the book is already available. You've actually got a better chance finding the book in Sweden than in Glendale. Who knew?

There are several black&white photographs in Animated Life and it might surprise you to know that many of them were taken with a Polaroid Land Camera. That's correct. This was way before James Garner and Mariette Hartley began pitching the color version of the camera for Polaroid in the wonderful television commercials they did some years ago. Anyway, most of the black&white photographs in my book were taken with this innovative new camera. Innovative for the fifties, anyway. The quality was particularly good and the photographs have held up remarkably well since this was over fifty years ago.

Look at this photograph of animation artist, Don Albrecht. This was taken in G-Wing during the production of Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty. Don would stop in at break time and plop down in one of the wonderful KEM Weber chairs in the office. We all had one in those days, you know. Nothing was too good for Walt's animation artists. You can bet an animator would rate an orange crate to sit on today. Anyway, look at the edge of the photograph. That's because after you took the picture and waited 60 seconds, you would open the rear of the camera and rip out the finished photo. Look at the quality. Consider this was over fifty years ago. Good job, Dr. Land!

Many of the artists at Walt Disney Productions were impressed by my little 60 second camera. Who knew at the time I was recording Disney history? If you want to see more, check out my new book, “Animated Life.” It's chock full of photographs taken with the famous Land camera. You may have to wait a bit, but Amazon.com is finally shipping.

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AuthorFloyd Norman