I’m late posting today because I spent the morning at Chapman University speaking with a delightful group of young people. I always find the special interaction with students encouraging and energizing. Thanks to Brian Alters for inviting me to Chapman University and for making this morning visit the highlight of my day.

Here’s a drawing of Briar Rose and Prince Phillip I sketched for one of the Disney storybooks. We’ve all made the move from pencil and paper to digital, so this particular sketch was created on my Cintiq Tablet. I was on the animation crew of Walt Disney’s masterpiece, “Sleeping Beauty” some years ago. The thing I remember most was how difficult these Disney characters were to draw. You would expect this aging artist would have learned a thing or two in fifty years. Alas, I found the Disney princess just as difficult to draw today as she was back in 1957. Some things, it would appear, simply never change.

Of course, my experience on Sleeping Beauty was only one of the many projects I’ve enjoyed in my many, many years in the animation business. When a young student requested advice on how he should pursue a career, I told him the answer was fairly simple. First, learn your craft. Whatever that discipline happens to be - determined to be the best you can be. Secondly, passion and determination will probably be the deciding factor whether you get that job you seek. I gave examples of young people determined to become film directors and gave their all to make it happen. Today, many of those same kids are now writing and directing motion pictures. It seem like childish dreams to some. However, dreams and determination are the things that get you there.

Thanks again, Brian Alters for allowing me to spend part of my Tuesday with some very smart talented and determined young people.

A rough sketch of Briar Rose and Prince Phillip from Disney's Sleeping Beauty. Over fifty years have passed and it doesn't get any easier.

A rough sketch of Briar Rose and Prince Phillip from Disney's Sleeping Beauty. Over fifty years have passed and it doesn't get any easier.

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AuthorFloyd Norman